Time On His Side: Man Sleeping On Couch (SOLD)

Peter Gray

Medium:

Oil On Canvas

Dimensions:

100cm x 50cm

More Artwork by Peter Gray

Peter sold his first painting at age 12. He studied and graduated from the University of Cape Town’s Michaelis School of Fine Art. Further studies led him into the fields of gemology, jewelry design, copper plate and seal engraving. Under the registered business of Peter Gray Arts he established a successful business in 1973 trading in the United Kingdom, Zimbabwe and the United States of America. In this period he embarked on an art career, painting portraits and taking on commissions, participating in a number of group exhibitions in and around London.

Reviews in The Times, Tatler and some of the foreign magazines gave good publicity and occasional notoriety to his work. He established a successful studio and workshop in Kent, England developing a good rapport with his local and international clients. In 1983 Peter Gray chose to relocate back to Zimbabwe where he opened up a large workshop and foundry producing bronze and silver sculpture.

These he sold with his paintings and specially commissioned jewelry and objet d’art in his gallery. Again his international connections grew with art pieces being exported worldwide. Since 1993 Peter Gray appointed agents in the U.K. and the U.S.A. to handle some of the work. Currently he resides in Cape Town, South Africa with his family. I have worked with these themes for a number of years now. The connection between wildlife and its management is intimated in the play on the word ‘game.’ My work as an artist focuses on this, allowing the possibility for the viewer to make contact and become involved. To a child the word ‘game’ carries with it the element of fun.

The connotations of ‘game,’ in respect of wildlife, are far more serious and even sinister at times. The selfish pursuit of wealth or position has had and continues to have negative impact on our natural environment. However At the same time, however, many work tirelessly and unselfishly to preserve it. Like it or not, we are all in the game – playing it out to a lesser or greater degree – sometimes as analysts or conservationists, at other times as spectators, but we all participate. All of us have a responsibility and are accountable. The rules change – new elements come in and old go out.

Ultimately though, the game will be played out and the outcome decided upon. This exhibition explores again the beauty of the game and as players the sometimes-bizarre connections that inevitably develop when we are involved and interact with it.